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Washington CC moves forward with wellness park plans

Union file photo

The Washington City Council approved a bid for the new wellness park at its meeting Tuesday, April 7.
Union file photo The Washington City Council approved a bid for the new wellness park at its meeting Tuesday, April 7.

WASHINGTON — The Washington City Council is moving forward with plans for the new wellness park as it approved a $2.9 million bid.

City Administrator Brent Hinson said the recommendation was for the council to accept the bid with all alternates, except those that would provide lighting for one of the baseball fields and the soccer fields. The council currently has grant applications out they are hoping will cover that cost as it cannot be worked into the budget right now.

All of the utilities for the lighting will be in place but the equipment will only be purchased for one. To light the other two, $350,000 is needed. The city has applied for more $425,000 in grants and the money from then would go toward this project, he said.

Moving along with development talk, the council approved a letter of intent from Brava Roof Tile to occupy the former Whitesell building on East Tyler Street. The city was gifted the building and will officially take ownership May 15, Hinson said. Once the city has ownership, a public hearing will take place before Brava Roof Tile can move in.

“I think we’ve got a great agreement that is mutually beneficial but we just can’t execute the final agreement until we own the building,” he said.

City employee safety was also a topic of concern as the council approved emergency sick leave. “This is something we are having to react to that has to do with federal legislation that was adopted about three weeks ago,” Hinson said.

Full time employees in the city were granted an additional 80 hours of emergency sick leave and part-time employees 2/3 of that amount, or as many hours as they have worked. The idea was to give employees additional time to take care of themselves during the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent spread and not make them feel they have to be at work, he said.